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Level Up!

Lauren Barnes
Donor Services Assistant
 
Making sure certificates are organized during
the monthly Cumulative Recognition process!
It’s crazy how fast time flies at the Elks National Foundation. I can’t believe I’ve already been the Donor Services Assistant for almost 8 months! It feels like I just started yesterday. In that time, I have had the honor of hearing from many generous Elks around the country, as well as ENF Fundraising Chairs who have had the opportunity to recognize members for their gifts to the Foundation.

As the Donor Services Assistant, I am in charge of running the Cumulative Recognition process each month. This means I organize and mail letters, certificates and pins to donors who have reached different giving levels over their lifetime. If you’re interested in learning more about the Individual Cumulative Recognition levels, please visit our website.


What’s great about the Cumulative Recognition program you ask? Pins of course! Each level of giving comes with a different pin. You can add these to your collection and wear them proudly to your Lodge, Grand Lodge Convention, or just for fun!
Recognition is also an assurance that you know we value your gifts and want to make sure that you are properly thanked. You are making such a big difference in Elk communities and we want to make sure you know your gifts will go far.

It never ceases to amaze me how generous Elks really are. Whether it’s a first time donation, or an Elk who has been donating for years, I am always humbled to hear from ENF Fundraising Chairs who recognize donors for their immense generosity.

Once such Chair is Amanda Jung of Orange Lodge No. 1475 in Orange, California. Amanda works hard to make sure her members are recognized for all of their hard work and support. When I recently heard about a recognition ceremony that Amanda organized, I had to share this story…Amanda states:

“I was honored to present Mr. Colin Smith, PER with the Elks National Foundation’s Permanent Benefactor pin and certificate at the Orange Elks Lodge meeting on Wednesday, December 9, 2015. Colin Smith has donated a total of $2,000 or more to the Elks National Foundation…Colin made his first donation to the ENF in May of 2004. His wife, Nicole, and son, Bradley (4 years old!), have also made donations to the Elks National Foundation over the years. In addition, Colin is a member of the ENF Fidelity Club.”

Before I started at the ENF, if you told me you know a 4-year-old who makes charitable gifts, I might think you’re teasing me. But as you can see with Bradley, it goes to show you’re never too young to make a difference.
Take Thomas Whealon of Fond du Lac, Wis., Lodge No. 57—
seen here proudly displaying his Permanent Benefactor certificate.

“Thomas Whealon is just one of our many members who realizes the importance of making a donation to the Elks National Foundation. Veterans and youth across our state benefit from the  donations our members make year after year. Thomas is shown receiving his Permanent Benefactor Certificate ($2,000) from Don Behnke, PER, Lodge No. 57 ENF Fundraising Chair. Thank you Tom!”

Paul Bradigan of
Kittanning, Pa. Lodge No. 203
being presented
his Permanent Benefactor award
from ER Dan Gallagher.
With all of these Permanent Benefactor stories, our donors make it look easy to give where you can. Take Paul’s advice, “It wasn’t hard. You just do a little at a time over the years. It’s even easier now that you can contribute online. ENF is a great cause.” Thanks for all of your support Paul!

Please consider thanking Lodge members for their generosity and hold a ceremony to show your support. Also, email pictures to me at LaurenB@elks.org or post recognition photos to the Elks National Foundation Facebook page the next time you present an award to your members. We love to hear from our Elks who are making a difference!


Lauren Barnes
Donor Services Assistant




With nearly 800,000 members and more than 1,900 Lodges nationwide, Elks are providing charitable services that help build stronger communities across the United States. The Elks National Foundation, the charitable arm of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, helps Elks build stronger communities through programs that support youth, serve veterans, and meet needs in areas where Elks live and work. To learn more, visit www.elks.org/enf.

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