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Meet the ENF Staff

Henriette Pruger
Donor Services Coordinator

If you've sent in a donation to the ENF ,
Henri's processed it!
How long have you been working at the ENF?
I am an oldie. I have been here for close to 32 years. I have never been someone who likes change. I like stability. It may not be an active position. As long as contributions come in, we will continue to process them. The funds we receive help pay for college scholarships, veteran projects and drug awareness. They not only help fellow Elk members, but they also help the community.

What projects are you/your department working on right now?
At the moment, we are just trying to keep up. Donor Services’ work demand has increased lately and we need to keep on top of it. The new thing I am doing is submitting gift batches. We are short a person and I am helping out. I am the person you call on in times of emergency. I have always been reliable. In addition to these duties, we will be shortly doing weekly recognition. Life is never dull at the Foundation.

What are you doing to celebrate ENF month?
I am doing my duties. I have many. I send out supply orders, do online orders, process daily work, change addresses on return mail, and file. I am constantly busy. New procedures come every day and I have to keep up. I work in the early preparation stages of the contribution process. We build the foundation on which everything happens. Donor Services is the rock of the Foundation.

What’s your favorite part of working at the ENF?
The work allows me to concentrate. I don’t feel guilty if I have to spend a couple hours on a project. I don’t live my life rushing. I like to take things slow and do things right. The world is constantly running. I like to sit back and smell the flowers. The daily processing procedures make this possible. The type of work we/I do always involves concentration.

Describe your average day at the ENF.
This is difficult to answer. No day is really average. I start out doing online orders and sending out supply orders. Then I start processing the contributions. This takes me most of the day. There are certain times of the month where I have other duties. I run the end-of-the-month labels and help mail out monthly reports. I also help out with other projects and they come in. If a duty involves detail precision, it is usually given to me. I am very good with details. When time allows, I check and change the addresses on return mail. And when the system is down, I help with filing. My duties vary depending on the time of the month and year.

What’s one thing about you that might surprise people?
I may seem like a very dry person, but I am very creative. My fellow workers already know this, but I am a self-published author. I currently have two books on Amazon.com and am in the process of trying to publish a third. My first book, A Gift from Nowhere, is a combination Pretty Woman meets Little House on the Prairie.

My second book, The Devil’s Portal, is the life, times and death of famous serial killer, H. H. Holmes. I spent two years researching him and lived at the Chicago Historical Society. I also researched the art of serial killing. Needless to say, I am a CSI fan. I wrote the book from the eye of an FBI profiler and am very proud of it. Everyone who has read it cannot believe how I was able to combine 80 percent facts and turn it into a dramatized ghost story. They all enjoy it. I am quite proud of it. I was able to tell the facts without going into excessive detail. I was raised on the old Universal monster movies where you never saw blood. Bela Lugosi and Boris Karloff are my idols. My favorite movie is the 1963 version of The Haunting, where you never even saw the ghost. I believe in the process of imagination.

What TV show do I never miss?
That’s easy, Doctor Who. I have been a fan since 1982 and have seen almost all of the series since it premiered in 1963.  I have met many of the doctors, alive and now dead, and have been to many conventions. I also like the spin-offs, such as Sarah Jane and Torchwood. The good Doctor and I are friends. The Rabbi that married my husband and me looked like David Tennant, Doctor Number 10. My husband and I even say we were married by the Doctor.

I love anything British. I have since the birth of the Beatles. I am an avid Beatles fan and have attended many Beatlefests. I love sitting under the stairs and jamming with other people. I even wrote an article, found on the web, called "The People Under the Stairs." Our videos can be seen on YouTube.

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