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Meet the ENF Staff

Colleen Muszynski
 Youth Programs Associate

Fans go wild for the ENF's starting
Youth Programs Associate—Colleen!
How long have you worked at the ENF?
I’ve worked at the ENF since June 2012, so a little over a year.

What projects are you working on right now?
Right now, I’m working on learning my new role with the Hoop Shoot. Recently, I moved from a Programs Assistant position with the Community Investments Program to the Youth Associate position, which means I’ll be running the day-to-day aspects of everything Hoop Shoot. I’m really excited about this new opportunity! Local Hoop Shoot contests are starting soon, so I’m working to make sure we can gather information from these contests across the country to highlight Hoop Shoot successes as contestants move to Districts.

What are you doing to celebrate ENF Month?

I’m constantly checking the Foundation’s website and Facebook page to read newly posted features on all of our awesome programs. I especially like reading the 25 Lodges in 25 Days feature, I never miss a day!

What’s your favorite part of working at the ENF?

My favorite part of working at the ENF, hands-down, is interacting with our amazing volunteers. Working with the CIP, and now in my new position with the Hoop Shoot, I have the opportunity to talk with Elks volunteers from across the country on a daily basis. I’ve had some great conversations with Elks during my tenure here so far. The commitment our volunteers have to positively impacting their communities is inspiring.

Describe your average day at the ENF.

My day at the ENF office usually starts with a quick morning meeting with my boss and fellow programs department co-workers. I really like hearing about the project my co-workers are working on—it’s a great way to stay engaged with the successes of our programs. Since I’m only about a week in to this new position with the Hoop Shoot, I’ve been spending the rest of my day reviewing program materials, reaching out to volunteers, and completing tasks to make sure I’m on track for the National Finals in April.

What’s one thing about you that might surprise people?

My dad and I started running 5K races together last summer. We’re gearing up to run our first half-marathon this November!

What TV show do you never miss?

Homeland! I’m completely hooked on this show, but since I don’t have Showtime, I do end up missing episodes when they air. I recently received season two for my birthday and I tore through the episodes in a week. I have to find a way to catch season three soon—it’s already started!

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